Introducing Our New Order Entry System!

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Hello Film Shooters!

I have been thrilled to see so many of you take advantage of our current order entry system.  Going order form free made things a little simpler for a lot of you, and it was an easy way for me to track and accept orders!  

However, the system as it currently stands has limitations.  There is no easy auto emailing system for film arrival, no standardized messages containing dropbox links, and most importantly, no perks program!

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Well, after a fair amount of work and some early testing, I am happy to announce our new order entry site!  It looks a lot better, and it works a lot better.   

You'll notice a more streamlined system of entering film rolls, process and scanning modifiers, and new options at check out.  You can now instantly pay for return shipping should you want your film returned as soon as the order is fulfilled, or opt for film storage.  There is also an option to have your film sent to The Film Hound! (More on that later).

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What you will probably be MOST excited about, is the new perks program.  Early NP customers may remmeber that I had a program for Pro Scans that was tierd, and allowed you to get better rates for a calandar year.  That was pretty popular, but it was all manually done and essentially worked out of a spreadsheet.  Way too much for me to handle now, and it left out my Simple Scan customers.   

Well I am now stoked to announce a simplifed perks program that even works for Simple Scans!  It's completely automatic, and can potentially save you a ton of money (that I just know you're going to spend on film).   

Here's how it works: 

Spend $10 - get one point. 

Accumulate 30 points - get a 25% off coupon. 

Woooooo that's all! 

For Simple Scan customers this will be a nice occasional perk that I hope you will see as a big thank you from NP for supporting us.  For my Pro Scan wedding clients, you could potentially get this coupon code after every wedding you submit, substantially reducing your yearly lab bill.  You don't have to be an Instagram Influencer to get preferred rates here!  You just have to love film, and support what we do.   

This online store is still brand new, so you can consider it in Beta to some extent.  There may be a few hiccups to work out, but one thing you can expect form us is continual improvments and innovation.  There is still a lot to announce this year regarding new services, so stay tuned.  *Caugh* Prints *Caugh*  

We'll talk more about it on the pod! 

Introducing the 4x5 Dev/Scan Workflow

Provia 100F - Schneider 150/5.6 APO Symmar

Provia 100F - Schneider 150/5.6 APO Symmar

Large format is where it’s at. It just is. When I first saw enlargements that my peers in college were doing with their 4x5 cameras, my brain basically exploded (thus explaining my GPA). When saw my first Alec Soth show at the Minneapolis Art Institute, I knew I was hooked. There is no conventional imaging medium that even comes close. Phase One can pack as many megapickles as they want into a 6x4.5 sensor, I’ll take a sheet of 4x5 film any day of the week.

But alas, the workflow totally sucks. The cameras are a bit…finicky, to put it mildly. It’s incredibly unforgiving. We used to have this stuff called Polaroid that allowed you to at least preview your shot, but they took that away from us. And labs want you to pay $20 bucks per sheet (!!!) for them to give you an Imacon scan of your mistakes.

No thank you, I think there is a better way.

Provia 100F - Schneider 150/5.6 APO Symmar

Provia 100F - Schneider 150/5.6 APO Symmar

This summer I embarked on an editorial project for Maine the Way, shooting 4x5 portraits on Provia 100F at a couple of Maine State Prison locations. These images were going to go into publication in a large magazine, sometimes requiring double page spreads. I knew I wanted scans that represented the image the way I would have printed 4x5 in the darkroom. That means all the edge material had to be intact. Imacon scanners can’t really do this. Flatbed scanners are laborious to use and often let you down, and drum scanners are prohibitively expensive.

I decided to try something new.

Using repro techniques that rely on high resolution camera capture, Nikkor macro lenses, and a high CRI Rosco light source, I can quickly and efficiently make high resolution scans of these films that are printable up to 20x25 without up-res’ing.

And now, you can too.

These scans come in at roughly 6063x4048 pixels, which translates to about 25mp. You can hit 20x25 by printing at 240ppi, or 16x20 at 300ppi. Careful upresing will push it even further. They’re incredibly detailed, the files have enormous latitude and potential in the editing process. For C41 the color conversions are based on Fuji Frontier color science, and thus meet the industry favorite profile you have come to expect from Portra & Ektar films (Fuji films being largely extinct in sheets save for their E6 stocks).

Pre Conversion

Pre Conversion

Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujinon 90/8

Kodak Ektar 100 - Fujinon 90/8

You might say, 25mp? That’s crazy, the scans I’m used to are measured in the hundreds of megapixels. That’s true! Traditional drum scans or even properly done flatbed scans are massive, and can be printed to mural sizes. These scans are not meant to compete with a drum scan. In fact, the great thing about film is that it can always be re-scanned when you go to exhibition or a book project. These scans are meant for your day-to-day project work with large format. Whether you be an enthusiast who just wants to try an old Speed Graphic, or you are in the midst of a long term documentary project on 4x5 and you need affordable scans to proof your ideas. These scans are perfect for that.

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Inmate, Warren Facility

For this image, I lit the scene with a single strobe held over-head and behind. My inspiration was 1940s era Kodachromes of factory workers during WWII. Shooting 4x5 allowed me to instill a matter of fact visual style, that instantly gives the image the feel of a historical document.

Chamonix 45N-2 - Schneider 150/5.6 APO Symmar - Provia 100F

In fact, I might argue that they’re perfect for 95% of large format applications. If Gerhard Steidl calls you up on the phone and says “Yo Gutentag! We gotta go to press with these sweet photographic gems!” It may be time to order drum scans. Until that happens, these files will edit incredibly well, print large, and allow you to share or proof whatever you may be working on.

The proof of the pudding is in the eating as they say, so I’ve included a couple full resolution JPGs of two scans I did while working on the project for Maine the Way. Check them out here.

4x5 Dev Scans are available now.

A new way to scan chromes

Provia 100F - Rollei Hy6 Mod 2 - 80/2.8 Xenotar - Bordered Scan

Provia 100F - Rollei Hy6 Mod 2 - 80/2.8 Xenotar - Bordered Scan

Slide film, or 'chromes' were once the undisputed champion of color photography.  Professionals stuck with chrome long after consumers had moved on to the more flexible color negative options. On the light-table, the reasons were obvious.  You get finer grain, pure color, and unrivaled contrast. Plus no need for an intermediary to view your film. It’s right there for the eye to see and understand.

For years though they've been neglected by photographers who use the hybrid film shooting workflow that labs like Northeast Photographic support.  If you have shot a roll of Velvia in the past few years and had it scanned on a Fuji Frontier or Noritsu, you may know why.  Washed out colors, noise, blown out highlights.  Just a lot of bleh! Whereas your original on the light-table remains beautiful.  What happened?  Lab scanners are incredible for negative films, they were built for this singular purpose.  Chromes were a dying medium, an afterthought.  Pros who shot it used drum scanners or dedicated desktop models only. It’s a laborious work flow, and if you’re doing drum scans, quite expensive.

That particular status quo isn't quite good enough for us, which is why we are introducing our new scanner to our chrome workflow.  Using Nikkor's best reproduction lenses, and CMOS capture technology, we are able to accurately reproduce all the detail, color, and contrast present in your slide.  So impressed have we been with our early results, that we can confidently say we think we offer the best full roll scans of E6 films in the business.  

These comparisons speak for themselves. 

Repro Scans - Leica M3 - 50mm Summilux - Kodak E100

Repro Scans - Leica M3 - 50mm Summilux - Kodak E100

Fuji Frontier

Fuji Frontier

Repro Scan - Leica M3 - 50mm Summicron Dual Range - Kodak E100

Repro Scan - Leica M3 - 50mm Summicron Dual Range - Kodak E100

Fuji Frontier

Fuji Frontier

Fuji Frontier

Fuji Frontier

Repro Scans - Leica M3 - 50mm Summilux - Kodak E100

Repro Scans - Leica M3 - 50mm Summilux - Kodak E100

It should be noted that these are from 35mm Ektachrome. Medium format looks even better. Honestly if you are shooting 120, you’ll never lust after medium format digital again.

This new way will be our standard method for scanning chromes. We can honestly say that for full roll scanning, no-one else in the business is providing this level of quality. And we’re not raising prices!

This post is not about how and when to shoot slide film, we will save that for later. This is about letting you know that if you use NP, you’re getting scans that actually bring to life the potential of your film.

We Support Open Borders

Image by Dave Waddell

Image by Dave Waddell

Cropping is for farmers, as my former professor Dan used to say.  Sadly in the hybrid workflow era cropping has become somewhat standard.  This is because the scanner technology we use is generally not designed to include those nice black borders we know and love from our favorite printed photographs.  

This was never acceptible to me.  A border is not only a great way to indicate the edge of an image, show that you did your composing in camera, and advertise the film stock or camera you may have used, it's also just simply super cool!  Those iconic Hasselblad notches are there for a reason.  You want people to know that you shot Ilford FP4+ damn it! (Not flippin HP5+, duh) 

Well as Justin Timberlake might say if he was a photographer, I am bringing sexy borders back.

Image by Dave Waddell

Image by Dave Waddell

Using the same technology that we use to make the best E6 scans in the business, we can also overscan your film frames to include the border.  This works in every format all the way up to 4x5, and it's even possible to scan to the edge of the sprocket holes in 35mm.  You will also benefit from a higher maximum resolution over a Frontier scan.

Image by Brennan McKissick

Image by Brennan McKissick

Because this is a style primarily associated with B&W images, we are starting the roll out of this service as a Monochrome only option for full rolls.  4x5 film will always be scanned with the border regardless of process type, of course. 

Image by Mark Sperry

Image by Mark Sperry

However, we aren't totally leaving color photographers out in the borderless cold.  Full border scans are available as single frame scans, and if you've processed your film at NP we will do these scans at a discounted rate.   You could think of our simple scans as your contact sheet, and your bordered scans as final prints.

Original Frontier Scan - Image by Mark Sperry

Original Frontier Scan - Image by Mark Sperry

C41 Conversion with Film Edge

C41 Conversion with Film Edge

What’s more, our conversions are based on Fuji Frontier color. We are quite pleased with the results. While not a perfect match, we actually prefer our manual conversion. 

You can order bordered scans for your B&W film right now! We’ll roll out color within a few days once we work it into the framework of our online store.